1800 REPLAS 

1800 737 527

TwitterFacebook

Footbridge hits the mark

On budget and on time, that’s the target every project aims for. Add in a material that’s durable as well as sustainable and you have a winning combination that really hits the mark.

A stunning 56 metre pedestrian bridge across Rifle Range Creek at Bagara has just been completed by Bundaberg Council in Queensland using Enduroplank™ decking with a composite fibre sub-structure.

‘This is a fantastic and much anticipated project which has completed a missing link of our Coastal Turtle Trail,’ said Bundaberg Divisional Councillor Greg Barnes. The materials chosen are both perfect in this coastal location as they are extremely hard wearing, long lasting and will not corrode, rust, or rot—unlike many alternatives.

  

 

 

Oscar and Ophelia

Two ospreys have spent the past 20 years returning to waters off Ceduna in South Australia, to breed on nests constructed by former oyster farmer Royce Hart. Having replaced the wooden structure six times, when the weather took its toll again it was decided a more durable material was needed.

Replas came to the bird’s rescue and provided composite fibre and recycled plastic which was used to create a new structure. The ospreys, nicknamed Oscar and Ophelia, come back each year to hatch their chicks and now have a nest that will last for more than forty years without the need for maintenance.

Brighton rocks with Replas

Three years ago Holdfast Bay Council approached Replas with a concept for Coast Park that included an up-market set of pedestrian structures, viewing decks and beach access pathways.

John Perkins, Project Officer Infrastructure, City of Holdfast Bay, said, ‘With this project we wanted to use products that would serve us for the long term, reducing our maintenance’.

John said, ‘This product and this project has turned out extremely well and we are happy with the material that has been used in this location’.

Recycled-plastic Enduroplank™ decking was chosen because it is sustainable and also highly durable. Composite fibre provided the perfect sub-structure as it is three times stronger than steel, one third of the weight and doesn't corrode in a high-salinity environment.

The first stage of this boardwalk alone has saved the equivalent of 2.1 million plastic bags from landfill.

   

Shorty’s Staircase

A revisit to the boardwalk at Lennox Point, shows the beach pathway is still in pristine condition almost four years after it was installed. A plaque on the staircase commemorates Ron (Shorty) Connors who according to local legend was the heart and soul of surfing in the 60s & 70s. The long-lasting Enduroplank™ provides a fitting platform for a dedication that needs to stand the test of time.

  

Built to last

Fort Courage is home to the Wentworth Angling Club and the location of monthly fishing competitions. Replas recently supplied materials for the construction of an access structure to two floating pontoons located along this magnificent stretch of the Murray River.

Steve Govan, the caretaker of Fort Courage Caravan Park, said that the materials were selected because, ‘there was no maintenance required and the structure would be there forever’. The composite fibre and Enduroplank™ structure, which was constructed by Diamond Club Member DFAB, is built to withstand 10 year flood levels. The team took under four days to complete the structure and Steve commended them on their ability to work together and to get the job done.

Creating better structures

Composite fibre is becoming the product of choice for clients looking for an alternative to traditional timber structures. It is low maintenance and light, yet extremely strong and can be pre-assembled on site or freighted in complete. Replas is very experienced in creating structures using composite fibre and offers a complete service from design to installation.

Under Construction

Tasmania’s largest construction company Fairbrother & John Holland teamed up to build the new Menzies Centre Building. Composite Fibre (FRP) bearers were specified for the substructure below the outdoor deck areas with 600 lm of product used. While the Fairbrother/John Holland tradespeople onsite were unfamiliar with FRP, they found it easy to work with. The major benefit it that it will long outlast timber which would have been the more traditional material chosen.

 

Murchison hooks an environmental solution

The mouth of the Murchison River is a much loved spot for Kalbarri locals to fish. The Shire of Northampton has now provided the perfect spot to cast a line in safety with the addition of a new platform made from recycled plastic and composite fibre. This timber free structure is perfect in this location as it is resistant to moisture and microorganisms and will not rot, crack or split.

 

Townsville upgrades to recycled plastic

Several timber bridges in a Townsville estate, in Queensland, were rotting and needed lots of maintenance. Townsville City Council decided a better solution was to use recycled -plastic decking combined with composite fibre. Replas spent a half a day training council staff to install the materials and installation was so successful that they have now replaced five of the deteriorated bridges.

  

  

A bridge over Tribulation waters

A 7 metre bridge made from composite fibre and recycled-plastic decking spans a gully in the rainforest of Cape Tribulation, Queensland. This timber free structure is perfect in this harsh environment as it is resistant to moisture, microorganisms and termites.